Archives: This week in Chester History


This Week in Chester History…

In 1960, Chester Township Council formed a Board of Health. There would be five appointments, who would elect their own president. Among other Council meeting items, Mayor William Conover presented the Chester Library budget. The librarian’s salary was $900. Source: Observer-Tribune


This Week in Chester History…

Four major car accidents occurred in the Chester Township area in 1961. In the first, five people were hurt when two cars collided on Ralston Road. Blowing snow blocked the vision of one driver who was then unable to see the oncoming car. Another car hit a telephone pole on Rt. 24, and a third driver lost control on North Road and was struck by a second car.


This Week in Chester History…

In 1962, the Observer-Tribune reported that Chester Township and Borough Police Chiefs Edward Strait and and Joseph Feltmann, respectively, teamed to arrest six vandals who caused $3000 worth of damage in the area. The vandals smashed four outdoor telephone booths, two cars’ windows, a solar installation on a utility pole, and a plate glass window in a warehouse.


This Week in Chester History…

According to the Observer-Tribune, in 1961, the Chester Borough and Township Councils held a joint meeting to discuss exceed their borrowing power to construct a new school.


This Week in Chester History…

In 1960, Assistant Principal William J. DeGennero resigned from the West Morris Regional High School. His reason was that he was unable to find suitable housing for his family within a reasonable distance of the school. The board offered a contract to Robert Ward at an annual salary of $8,300. Source: Observer-Tribune


This Week in Chester History…

At the end of 1960, the sizable West Morris Regional High School band received $2000 for new instruments and $1573 for uniforms. School Board member Carl Braun compared the funding to the $8000 investment in football equipment. Principal Leonard Saunders restricted band membership to 95 due to limited practice space.


This Week in Chester History…

In 1960, the Duncan Hines travel book Adventures in Good Eating named Auberge Provençale and the Harvest House as recommended restaurants. The 416-page guide contained 4500 listings — culled from “half a million eating and lodging places in North America,” reported the Observer-Tribune


This Week in Chester History…

In 1960, the Chester Borough Council discussed instituting a curfew ordinance to address the vandalism of the previous October. Councilman William Tredway said Roxbury Township’s ordinance required that anyone under 16 years of age be off the streets by 9:30 p.m. Lake Hopatcong’s ordinance was even stricter, requiring anyone under 18 to be home by 9:30 p.m. or face a $100 fine,


This Week in Chester History…

Chester Township Mayor Bill Conover announced his desire to widen Ironia Road, in 1960. The Observer-Tribune marked his warning to property owners, “If they want to keep their stone walls, fence posts, and stairs, they’d better move them.”


This Week in Chester History…

In 1960, the Observer-Tribune reported that 21 students made the West Morris Regional High School honor roll: Seniors — George Bonsall, Bruce Caruthers, Judy Chmiele, Betsy Dippel, Jean Engel, Penny Gilmer, Geoffrey Helman, John Huemer, Barbara Twillman; Juniors — Linnea Abbott, Louis Bell, Clifford Garrison, Abbey Ann Hewens, Barbara Rowitzer; and Sophomores — Peggie Cowie, Mary Cronlund, Carol Heding, Margo Mulvihill,